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About me, how to use this guide

How to use this guide

Global education is designed to prepare students for the interconnected communities in which they will be living and working in the 21st century. Although global education is popularly framed in the context of competition and dominance (“To Be Globally Competitive, We Must Also Be Globally Competent,” “Are U. S. Students Ready to Compete?” and “Education Olympics: How Does America Rank Compared to Other Countries?”), we must also see it as a means of making students more globally collaborative, as well as competitive. Many of the issues these students will face in the 21st century—global warming, electronic communication, poverty and hunger, war and refugees—are not merely domestic and cannot be solved by one nation alone.

The purpose of this guide is to provide a resource for teachers incorporating global education into their subjects. While much of its designed scope is local—directed toward teachers at Pompano Beach High School, the Blanche Ely Innovation Zone, and Broward County Public Schools—I hope educators and stakeholders across the country and across the world find something useful here.

This website is set up as the capstone project for my participation in the Teachers for Global Classrooms program, funded by the U. S. Department of State and administered by IREX. A highlight of this program was a three-week fellowship in India, where I was hosted by The Teacher Foundation and by Kendriya Vidyalaya Air Force Station Jorhat. The blog entries from July 6 to July 31, tagged “India travel log,” provide my immediate reflections during that wonderful experience. There are also pages for …

Feel free to browse, read, enjoy, use, and—important to me—comment. As a website, this is a constantly renewable document that I hope all of us can use for personal and professional development. Your feedback and suggestions will make this resource even better.

This website is not an official U.S. Department of State website. The views and information presented are my own and do not represent the Teachers for Global Classrooms Program, IREX, or the U.S. Department of State.

About me

Andrew Shipe has been teaching English language and literature at Pompano Beach High School since January 2000. He teaches seniors (age 17-18) in Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition, and sophomores (age 15-16). He also teaches students of all high school grade levels in journalism, serving as the adviser to Tornado Times, the student newspaper, for all four years of its existence. This year his average class size is 25 students.

Andrew serves as chair of the English department, coordinating curriculum and mentoring teachers. He also serves as an adjunct professor of English at Broward College, and as an adjunct professor of education at Nova Southeastern University. This year will be the 10th year he works as a reader for the College Board, scoring the essays students write on the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition exam.

Andrew is married with two children, and his hobbies are running, golf, and coaching his son’s soccer and baseball teams. His primary objectives for participating in TGC were to learn how the education process works internationally and how to best prepare his students to have a larger perspective on the smaller world in which they will live.

Vita

One Comment
  1. Dr. Shipe, I had a chance to peruse the site and I am impressed with the general quality of the work. It is definitely something that I will use periodically. If I come across anything that I think should be included, I will let you know. Thank you for the time and effort you have put into this worthwhile endeavor.

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